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I wasted great bonding time and denied myself some wonderful experiences by not being myself.Of course, you should only come out when you're ready, and I wasn't at the time.ASPEN, Colo.—Usually when a group of middle-aged people gather to kvetch about twenty-somethings, it's about how they're always texting, or they spend too much time on the social medias, or they're boomeranging back to their parents' homes because they're afraid to just walk right up to a business owner, look him straight in the eye, and ask for a job.But at the Aspen Ideas Festival Tuesday, a unique Millennial gripe was aired: Kids these days, they just don't know how to fall in love.But try not to make assumptions about your new hallmates.

Now, however, social scientists have examined them exhaustively and empirically. But is it possible students are also using Tinder not for sex but to find friends? There’s certainly reason to be skeptical, experts say, but there might be a kernel of truth there.More than half of college students in a recent survey said they were using Tinder and other dating apps (but mostly Tinder) to find friends, not hookups. “That seems a little bit of a stretch,” said Aditi Paul, a Ph. candidate at Michigan State University whose research has found online daters tend to break up faster and more often and are less likely to end up married than their off-line counterparts.Economists Peter Arcidiacono and Marjorie Mc Elroy of Duke and Andrew Beauchamp of Boston College examined an enormous trove of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, more commonly known as The poll asked a broad range of questions about health and behavior—and the data set has become the basis of dozens of famed medical, sociological, and economic studies.(For instance, James Fowler of UC-San Diego recently used data from Add Health be a genetic foundation for an individual's political beliefs.) For their paper, Arcidiacono, Mc Elroy, and Beauchamp focused on the dating and sex lives of high schoolers—a subject much-analyzed by magazine editors and romantic-comedy screenwriters, but less familiar to social scientists.

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