Royal doulton identifying marks dating

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Meissen’s Johann Joachim Kändler, who is often credited with creating the format of the porcelain figurine itself, is the best known of these early artists, producing likenesses of the lecherous Pantalone, the spirited Columbine, and all manner of mischievous harlequins.While Meissen may have been the place where European porcelain was born, Dresden is where its decoration was perfected and popularized, so much so that today, many people still mistakenly talk about Dresden china when they really mean Meissen.To this day, Meissen remains a major center for the earthy art, while Dresden is best known as the place where Meissen porcelain is decorated, often within an inch of its life.One of the most popular early subjects of Dresden and Meissen figures was Italian commedia dell'arte, whose colorfully costumed actors were the perfect foils for the meticulous treatment they would receive at the hands of their German decorators.They let firms like Spode and Rockingham do the pioneering work. Many of the old antique bone china making firms have not survived to the current day.New makers with tighter marketing plans have taken their place over the last 60 years or so.Many antiques have marks on the underside that are stamped, impressed or painted.These marks generally help with identification and dating of the piece by giving a significant historical point of reference.

For instance one website, Antique-Marks, has more than 10,000 images of maker's marks and trademarks found on antique pottery and porcelain.hotographs in this table of marks, unless otherwise noted, are those that were made by us from actual pieces we currently own or have owned in the past; this table also includes photographs that have been contributed to us by our many viewers.By your submission, you are granting us permission to publish your pictures, information, and questions should we so choose and as we so choose, whether in this format or other published formats by Sharon Dickinson, unless you state otherwise at the time of your submission.The firing temperature needs to be high and so is expensive to produce.The first firm to develop a reliable recipe was Spode in 1799. Germany, France and the rest of Europe stuck to their older, more traditional Chinese porcelain recipes (no animal bone).

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